Blackstone Igniter Not Sparking? – Troubleshooting Guide

Imagine this: It’s a clear summer evening, the lawn’s been mowed, and the backyard smells like freshly clipped grass and opportunity. You’ve got your friends coming over, the cooler’s stocked with beverages, and your Blackstone griddle is primed and ready. You’ve got a platter of marinated delights, just begging to sizzle on the griddle. You push the igniter button with the confidence of a master griller, but… nothing happens. The Blackstone igniter is not sparking.

No spark, no flame, no sizzle. Just the quiet ticking of an igniter that refuses to cooperate.

Before the panic sets in, or the thought of dialing your local pizza place starts to creep up, remember this: You’re not the first backyard warrior to encounter this predicament, and I’ve got you covered.

The usual telltale sign of sparks not being created is that the Blackstone igniter is clicking but not lighting.

First and foremost – if the issue indeed lies in the ignition system and not in the gas flow, then you can always light the burners by hand.

Of course, most of us don’t want to keep igniting the griddle with a matchstick or a candle lighter forever. Let’s walk through some potential issues and their fixes to bring your sparks back.

Table of Contents

Battery Issues

Your Blackstone griddle may play hard to get because of something as simple as a battery issue. Let’s clear up one thing first – this only applies to models with push-button ignition. If yours has a piezoelectric ignition, move along to the next section.

Now, if your igniter is battery-powered, here are a couple of things you might want to check:

  • Battery not installed: It might sound like a no-brainer, but in the flurry of excitement of unboxing your new griddle or after a thorough cleaning, the battery might not have found its way back to its little home. Just slide the battery cover off, pop the battery in, and you could be back in business.
  • Dead battery: Here’s another easy fix. Batteries don’t last forever and it’s not uncommon for them to give up the ghost at the most inconvenient times. Grab a fresh one, swap it out, and give that ignition button another push.
AA batteries

Sometimes, the solution is as simple as a quick battery check. It’s a small step but might just be the key to reclaiming your grillmaster title.

Igniter Needle Out of Position

If battery issues aren’t the culprit, it might be time to take a closer look at the igniter rod. When the needle is out of position, it can throw a wrench into your grilling plans. you will need to lift the griddle top to get to the igniter rod – be careful because it’s heavy.

Let’s break it down:

  • Igniter needle too far from burner tube: If the needle’s positioned too far from the burner tube, the spark might not be created.
  • Igniter needle touching the burner tube: On the flip side, if it’s touching the burner tube, it won’t spark either as the electric current will simply run through the burner tube.

The optimal distance for the needle? About 1/4 inch away from the burner tube. Too close or too far won’t do. Just right, and you’re back on track.

And here’s the good news: you can adjust the needle by hand. So, roll up those sleeves and channel your inner handyman – or handywoman! Just be sure your griddle is turned off and cooled down before you dive in. Safety first, after all!

Dirty Igniter Needle

Now, let’s talk dirt. I know, it’s not the most glamorous topic, but we’re all friends here. You see, grilling can get messy and that mess could be keeping your igniter from doing its job.

Although it’s less likely to happen on a griddle when compared to a gas grill, a dirty igniter needle can prevent the spark from arcing over to the burner tube. It’s kind of like trying to light a match with a wet tip – not going to work, my friend.

Grab a clean, dry cloth and gently wipe off the needle. If the grime is a little more stubborn, you might need to employ a soft brush or an old toothbrush to dislodge it. A gentle touch is all you need.

Once you’re done, give the igniter another shot and watch for the spark to make its comeback.

Loose Igniter Wires

We’ve all had days where we feel a little disconnected, and your igniter wires are no exception. Loose wires can be the invisible culprits keeping your griddle from lighting up, so let’s take a look.

Vibrations during transport, frequent use, or just plain old bad luck can cause the wires to wiggle loose from their connections. Don’t worry; you don’t need an engineering degree to fix this. All you have to do is to identify the loose wire and plug it back in.

Sometimes, the disconnection isn’t visible to the naked eye. In such cases, unplugging and plugging the wires back in might just help reestablish a good connection. It’s the griddle equivalent of the age-old IT advice, “Have you tried turning it off and on again?”

In the world of igniters, the connection is key. Securing those loose wires could mean the difference between a cold griddle and a flaming good time.

Dead Igniter

So, we’ve tried batteries, adjusted the igniter needle, cleaned it up, and checked the wires. If your igniter’s still stubborn, it may be time to consider the possibility of a dead igniter.

Yes, it’s a bit of a downer, but it’s not the end of the world or your grilling dreams. Igniters can be replaced, and with a bit of DIY spirit, you can do it yourself. Heck, I’ve seen people commenting on Youtube that they wanted to throw away their Blackstone just because the igniter wasn’t sparking.

Here’s how to check whether the igniter may need a replacement:

  1. Battery-powered igniter: To check whether it’s indeed given up the ghost, remove the igniter from the griddle and check whether sparks are created between the prongs used for the cable connection. Of course, you should check the battery first.
  2. Piezo igniter: You’ll need to shut off the gas for safety first. Then, unplug the ignition wire and try to ignite the burner while looking at the spot where the wire was connected. If you don’t see sparks, it’s a safe bet your igniter’s gone to that big barbecue in the sky.

If you need to replace the igniter, you can order a new one by contacting customer service or even find third-party ones available on Amazon. A fresh igniter might be just the spark you need to get back to grilling glory.

Conclusion

There you have it, fellow grill enthusiasts – a quick guide to troubleshooting your Blackstone griddle when the igniter refuses to spark. We’ve covered everything from checking for battery issues, adjusting and cleaning the igniter needle, and securing any loose wires, to diagnosing a dead igniter.

While it can be a bit disheartening to face these issues, especially when you’re looking forward to a grilling session, they’re often simple to resolve. With a bit of patience, a touch of DIY spirit, and this guide, you’ll be back to grilling in no time.

Here’s to many more sparking grilling sessions under the summer sky!

FAQ

Can I manually light my Blackstone griddle?

Yes, you absolutely can. You will need a long matchstick or a long lighter to reach the burners.

Does my Blackstone Igniter need a battery?

That depends on what model of Blackstone griddle you have. If your griddle has a dedicated ignition button then it most likely needs a battery to function.

What type of batteries are needed for Blackstone griddle?

Blackstone griddles use a single AA battery for the ignition system.

Where can you find the battery on the Blackstone griddle?

The battery is located behind the ignition button. You just have to unscrew it from the front plate.

Can you replace the igniter box on Blackstone griddle?

Yes, the igniter is replaceable and it’s not difficult to do so. Contact customer service about getting a new igniter for your griddle.

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John Carder

John Carder is the founder of FreshAirChef.com. He loves to cook outdoors, especially over a campfire. John has a lovely wife and two cats who he loves dearly. In his spare time, he likes to play soccer and paint; he's not particularly good at either, but he enjoys the process nonetheless. He also has silly long hair which often gets in his way while cooking!